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The Dangers Of Overhead Power Lines Best Practices

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Every year individuals at work are killed or seriously injured when they come into contact with live overhead electrical energy power lines. These events frequently involve:

  1. machinery, eg cranes, lorry-loader cranes, combine harvesters, and tipping trailers;
    devices, eg scaffold tubes and ladders;
  2. work activities, eg loading, dumping, lifting, spraying, and stacking.
  3. If a machine, scaffold tube, ladder, and even a jet of water touches or gets too near an overhead wire, then electrical power will be performed to earth. This can cause a fire or surge and electric shock and burn injuries to anybody touching the machine or equipment. An overhead wire does not require to be touched to trigger serious injury or death as electrical energy can jump, or arc, throughout small gaps.

One of the biggest problems is that people simply do not notice overhead lines when they are worn out, rushing or cutting corners. They can be challenging to identify, eg in foggy or dull conditions, when they blend into the environments at the edge of woodland, or when they are running parallel to, or under, other lines Constantly assume that a power line is live unless and till the owner of the line has actually validated that it is dead. This guidance is for individuals who may be planning to work near overhead lines

where there is a threat of contact with the wires, and describes the steps you should take to avoid contact with them. It is primarily targeted at companies and employees who are monitoring or in control of work near live overhead lines, however it will also be useful for those who are carrying out the work.

Kinds of overhead power lines.

The majority of overhead lines have wires supported on metal towers/pylons or wooden poles - they are typically called 'transmission lines' or 'circulation lines'. Most high-voltage overhead lines, ie greater than 1000 V (1000 V = 1 kV) have wires that are bare and uninsulated but some have wires with a light plastic covering or covering. All high-voltage lines must be dealt with as though they are uninsulated. While numerous low-voltage overhead lines (ie less than 1 kV) have bare uninsulated wires, some have wires covered with insulating product. Nevertheless, this insulation can in some cases be in bad condition or, with some older lines, it might not function as efficient insulation; in these cases you must treat the line in the same way as an uninsulated line. If in any doubt, you must take a preventive method and speak with the owner of the line.

There is a legal minimum height for overhead lines which varies according to the voltage carried. Usually, the higher the voltage, the higher the wires will need to be above ground. Equipment such as transformers and merges attached to wood poles and other types of assistances will typically be listed below these heights. There are also recommended minimum clearances published by the Energy Networks Association.

What does the law require?

The law needs that work may be performed in close proximity to live overhead lines only when there is no alternative and just when the risks are acceptable and can be correctly controlled. You should utilize this guidance to prepare a danger assessment that is specific to the site. Companies and staff members who work close to an overhead line should handle the threats. Overhead line owners have a task to minimise the risks from their lines and, when sought advice from, encourage others on how to control the threats. The line owner will generally be an electricity company, known as a transmission or circulation network operator, however might likewise be another kind of organisation, eg Network Rail, or a local owner, eg the operator of a caravan park.

Preventing overhead line contact

Good management, preparation and consultation with interested celebrations before and throughout any work close to overhead lines will minimize the risk of accidents. This uses whatever kind of work is being prepared or carried out, even if the work is short-term or of short duration. You should manage the threats if you plan to work within a distance of 10 m, determined at ground level horizontally from listed below the nearest wire.

Remove the threat, the most efficient method to prevent contact with overhead lines is by not performing work where there is a danger of contact with, or close method to, the wires. Avoiding danger from overhead power line construction. If you can not avoid working near an overhead line and there is a danger of contact or close approach to the wires, you ought to consult its owner to find out if the line can be permanently diverted far from the work area or changed with underground cables. This will frequently be unsuitable for irregular, short-duration or transitory work. If this can not be done and there remains a threat of contact or close technique to the wires, learn if the overhead line can be temporarily switched off while the work is being done. The owner of the line will need time to think about and act on these types of requests and might levy a charge for any work done.